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Tag Archives: adventure

Wee-Views: The Ring of Solomon and The Merlin Conspiracy

The to-read pile continues to grow (and I have yet to pick up this book club’s selection, A Discovery of Witches, probably because some of the reviews make me feel slightly frightened) and I have an ever growing pile of books that need to be reviewed. So I make some headway and so I feel at least slightly accomplished, I’m writing Wee-Views of some of these books. I’m going to skip all the plot summaries (you can read those on Amazon.com or any other online book site) and cut right to my opinions. I’ll also rate these on a scale of 1 to 10 (10 being exceptionally good). Read the rest of this entry »

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The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern’s Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure by William Goldman

This is one of those cases where the movie may just be a bit better than the book. Of course, I may be biased as I’ve seen the movie more times than I care to admit and can be counted on to quote bits of the movie at random (I adore the clergyman with the speech impediment). I broke down and bought The Princess Bride Kindle edition (1) because it was cheap and (2) because I needed the literary equivalent of comfort food. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on January 4, 2011 in Author: William Goldman, Fantasy

 

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The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly

I’ve been sitting on my review of The Book of Lost Things for a while now, mulling over it, searching for something else like it, and generally stewing. There are many modern novels that reinvent fairy tales for their own purpose, but The Book of Lost Things does it particularly well.

In 1939, when England is at war with Germany, a young boy named David loses his mother. He clings to her memory like a worn blanket, and clutches at the stories they shared together, stories that “come alive in the telling.” Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on October 11, 2010 in Adventure, Author: John Connolly, Fantasy, Literature

 

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The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Perilous Journey — Trenton Lee Stewart

Reynie, Kate, Sticky, and Constance return in this sequel to The Mysterious Benedict Society. Set one year after the first book’s events, the quartet become embroiled in international intrigue that only they can unravel. Mr. Benedict had planned a globe-trotting scavenger hunt for the kids, but was kidnapped by Mr. Curtain before he could surprise the children, who are the only ones who can decipher his clues and determine his whereabouts. With only their extraordinary wits and sheer determination to guide them, the children leap from one precarious situation to the next before rescuing their mentor.

This was a well-written sequel to the excellent original novel. As all children and good characters are wont to do, these children evolve, but without losing the quirkiness that makes them so memorable. Sticky struggles with his new-found pride and strives to be as brave as his friends. Constance, while as contrary as ever, seems to have softened with age. Reynie, from whose point of view the story is mainly told, struggles with his perceptions of others–people are much more complex than they would seem. Kate, from what I noticed, remained essentially the same–brave, resourceful, and full of exuberant energy.

 

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The Mysterious Benedict Society — Trenton Lee Stewart

The Mysterious Benedict Society is one of those breezy, yet exciting reads that keeps me reading children’s fiction, even though I’m no longer the target audience. Meaty enough for adults at 471 pages (trade paperback) but written in a linear, simple style for younger readers, Benedict combines precocious orphans with perilous adventures to great effect.

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