RSS

Category Archives: Fantasy

Strange Practice by Vivian Shaw

Strange Practice by Vivian Shaw

Strange Practice by Vivian Shaw features Dr. Greta Helsing, a descendent of monster hunters. Instead of hunting monsters she now practices medicine for monsters. The nature of her practice, based in modern-day London, must remain secret so her patients can remain safe. That balance is threatened when a group of monks starts targeting supernatural creatures, as well as the good doctor herself. It’s up to Greta and her friends to stop the group before London falls to its knees.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 12, 2017 in Author: Vivian Shaw, Fantasy

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Jenny Redcape by Amanda Kespohl

Jenny Redcape by Amanda Kespohl

I beta-read Jenny Redcape when it was a work-in-progress and was privileged to see it evolve into its polished, finished form. This short story takes place in a larger story world created by Amanda Kespohl. In this medieval fantasy setting, demons plague the wilderness, but it’s humans who hold the most danger for one another.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 12, 2017 in Author: Amanda Kespohl, Fantasy

 

Tags: , , , , ,

The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia A. McKillip

The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia A. McKillip

I’m a huge Patricia McKillip fan, having read most of her books and short stories (and those I haven’t read, I’m saving for a rainy day), so I was over the moon when I learned that Tachyon will be reissuing her 1974 fantasy novel (and World Fantasy Award Winner), The Forgotten Beasts of Eld this fall.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 12, 2017 in Author: Patricia A. McKillip, Fantasy

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Reaper by Katrina Monroe

20141130-231415.jpg

REAPER is Katrina Monroe’s debut novel from Melange Books. I reviewed an advanced digital book.

This fast-paced urban fantasy follows Oz, a recently-deceased writer who serves in the Department of Creative Death and Ironic Punishment writing deaths for others. He counts his days on a seemingly endless kitten calendar until one day, he’s freed from his desk. Well, sort of. Oz is being sent on a new mission on Earth. His job is to accompany and learn from Bard, a Reaper, as he bears away souls of the newly dead. Sounds easy enough.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 30, 2014 in Author: Katrina Monroe, Fantasy

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Jonesing for a Good Read: What Makes Diana Wynne Jones Magical

Howl's Moving Castle

Howl’s Castle – From the Miyazaki film

Diana Wynne Jones is one of the authors I foist on everyone who asks for a fantasy reading recommendation. Because I didn’t discover her work until I was well into my twenties (thanks to the Miyazaki film version of HOWL’S MOVING CASTLE), I try to make up for lost time and spread the word of an author whose works deserve to be widely read.

My relationship with HOWL’S MOVING CASTLE is a bit backwards. Usually, I seek out the book before watching the movie, but I didn’t in this case. Howl, a tortured wizard with a penchant for snazzy dressing and a weakness for hair dye, was the perfect animated hero. Sophie was also a nuanced heroine with a tinge of sadness so common in Miyazaki films, and Calcifer just cracked me up. I ended up loving the film and I knew I had to read the book.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
4 Comments

Posted by on March 21, 2013 in Author: Diana Wynne Jones, Fantasy, Tribute

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

#Plottymouths: Five Favorite Literary Leading Men

For our #GettingLucky Twitter love story event on March 16, I’m writing about some of my all-time favorite literary leading men. I’ll probably add a post on leading ladies in the future, since it takes two to share smoldering looks across a crowded room.

Why leading men? You can’t have a good love story without a swoon-worthy romantic lead. Some of them are dark and brooding, others a sweet and loving, some noble, others not so much, but they all have that magnetic spark that inevitable attracts their leading ladies, and the readers.

As you can probably guess, a great leading man isn’t a stock character. He has to be someone you can picture as a real person, and identify with his triumphs and travails. He sometimes falters on his quest (whether for the Holy Grail or the heroine’s hand) and loses his way, but you root for him nonetheless. I’m not going to focus on the typical romance hero, because in many ways, he is a stock character. Also, I don’t think great romances are limited to just one genre.

Quick note: there are spoilers below, as I couldn’t discuss these heroes without disclosing specific story details.

Read the rest of this entry »

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Root Bound (Emma & the Elementals #1) by Tanya Karen Gough

Root Bound by Tanya Karen GoughNote: I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Root Bound is the first of a planned quartet called Emma and the Elements. This middle grade fantasy series follows Emma as she comes of age and discovers how her unique magic can restore order to the mysterious land of Under. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: